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Post Info TOPIC: Thoughts needed please


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Thoughts needed please


KayCeeT ..

The conjecture that;

If you are traveling in a RV and it breaks down you have lost your home whilst it goes off to the "menders" ... where as if you had a caravan and tug... you can stay in the caravan (out of harm's way) whilst the mysterious spanner spinners fix your tug.

That is so "not how" these things work. Here is my 2 pennies.

In the real world you live in your truck. That truck is your life. When you have maintenance issues you do your research and find out where to take your truck to get it fixed. You live in your truck. You are competent with tools to the extent that they will put you on the books to act as a "work experience" intern so as if anything goes wrong you are covered by workers comp. You become the "offsider" to the bloke that is putting tools on the job.... i e your Home. Even if you dont smoke you bum a rollie at smoko time in the workshop when these guys are helping you get your home back and mobile... You fix your own truck as a temporary employee along side your work mates... anything else would be genocide. If it takes some time waiting parts you live in your truck (where else?) parked within the yard of your chosen temporary savoir and employer. Until forever.

You must be like the turtle who loves her shell because that is the only place she can tolerate ....

Hope that helps..

M



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In 2015, we had a serious engine problem with our motorhome in Norway (where a mechanic costs $220+ per hour).
It took about 3 days to fix. During that time, we continued to live in the vehicle. At night they pushed the vehicle outside the workshop to close the roller door and provided us a power cable so we could run a heater to keep warm, no extra charge.
No problems.

P1070122E.JPG

The breakdown problem with a motorhome being discussed is an imagined one. We have never experienced it. It is just as likely that the caravan is the breakdown instead of the tug.

Cheers,

Peter



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msg


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Totally agree. MOAB & Peter & Margaret.

In my 10yrs I have only broken down once. My first trip. It was really a Claytons breakdown. The engine management light came on. Still drove Ok no limp mode or anything like that.
Arrived in Gunndawindi and contacted NRMA. The repair shop diagnosed all sorts of terrible things turbo, ECG, water pump, fuel pump. They had heart failure and said they couldn't fix it. But they let me stay in their yard overnight.

NRMA organised a truck to take me & the van to Maroochydore. 400ks. where I had an appointment and set me up in a CP. Risked it and drove about a kilometre to the dealership the next morning. Dealership kept it all day, (was allowed to occupy when they weren't working on it. They ended up fitting a new fuel pump and reset the the computer.

This problem with the light coming on continued every 300 ks or so. down the east coast. Calling in to various dealerships who recommended various fixes. Finally hit Sydney and took it into KEA (Hire co where I had purchased). Apparently they had dealt with this issue a few times. Had something to do with the different driving styles. They remapped the computer which took about 1/2hr. and everything has been fine from then on.



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Peter_n_Margaret wrote:
The breakdown problem with a motorhome being discussed is an imagined one. We have never experienced it.

 

You have clearly forgotten the lady in Perth with the Fiat with the broken axle. And, of course, you have no knowledge of my friend Michael whose motorhome was in the repair shop for months whilst they removed the body in order to effect the necessary repairs upon the engine.

Peter; just because something has not, yet, happened to you doesn't mean it can't. But even if it did it won't really matter, to you, because you don't *live* in your motorhome - you'll just suffer a ruined holiday and return to your home.

And as for the concept of shadowing the repair mechanic! Tell that to Workcover in these overly safety conscious days.

It is beyond me why you people are so desperate to deny the possibility of an obvious potential problem - confirmation bias to the extreme, it appears.



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Mike Harding wrote:

Peter_n_Margaret wrote:
The breakdown problem with a motorhome being discussed is an imagined one. We have never experienced it.

 

You have clearly forgotten the lady in Perth with the Fiat with the broken axle. And, of course, you have no knowledge of my friend Michael whose motorhome was in the repair shop for months whilst they removed the body in order to effect the necessary repairs upon the engine.

Peter; just because something has not, yet, happened to you doesn't mean it can't. But even if it did it won't really matter, to you, because you don't *live* in your motorhome - you'll just suffer a ruined holiday and return to your home.

And as for the concept of shadowing the repair mechanic! Tell that to Workcover in these overly safety conscious days.

It is beyond me why you people are so desperate to deny the possibility of an obvious potential problem - confirmation bias to the extreme, it appears.





something like murphy'law and anything is possible . i can remember reading about a lady breaking down(maybe same one) an not having access to her home for a long period of time while waiting for parts.
we were traveling in a motor home out back an hit a kangaroo, had to stay in a motel while waiting for new radiator to be sent out from Brisbane 3 days no big problem, parts were available for the vehicle (Toyota) some have to be ordered from overseas

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msg


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Mike, You seem dead against motor homes. Why? Of course, bad things can happen. But they only happen on rare occasions. Bad things can happen when stranded with a caravan. Only you are relying on two vehicles to perform as necessary. For that women in Perth, what was wrong with hiring a cabin until everything was fixed. This is what having sufficient backup to cope with disasters is for. Going off without sufficient contingency planning is foolish.



-- Edited by msg on Wednesday 22nd of July 2020 01:01:10 PM

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msg wrote:

Mike, You seem dead against motor homes.


 

Not at all - you're making that up because you don't like my criticisms.

Motorhomes are fine for holidays (I had one in the USA) and I looked long and hard at converting a bus for my current permanent nomad lifestyle but, for the reasons I've given, are not best suited for *permanent living*.



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Mike Harding wrote:
msg wrote:

Mike, You seem dead against motor homes.


 

Not at all - you're making that up because you don't like my criticisms.

Motorhomes are fine for holidays (I had one in the USA) and I looked long and hard at converting a bus for my current permanent nomad lifestyle but, for the reasons I've given, are not best suited for *permanent living*.


 I suggest that most of the rest of the world (with the possible exception of Australia and the USA) disagrees with you Mike, but whatever "floats your boat" as the saying goes.

Cheers,

Peter



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Vehicles will break down & you need appropriate options.

Many decades ago other half was working in shop & a customer was letting off steam that her Mercedes Benz had broken down. The lady was annoyed by the inconvenience as she didn't like driving her spare Rolls Royce!



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Whenarewethere wrote:

Vehicles will break down & you need appropriate options.


A little off topic, but here is a story.

And there is generally more than one option available so a choice needs to be made.

In 2017, we broke a rear axle half way across the Simpson. There was no way we could continue through the dunes in front wheel drive only.

There were several options....

1. Have our friend tow us to Birdsville with us providing what traction we could from the front wheel drive. This would put considerable stress on both vehicles and risk a second break down or more damage.

2. Get a recovery vehicle to come and get us. There was a suitable vehicle in Birdsville. The hourly rate was about $300 per hour from the time he got the 'phone call until he was back in the pub after the job. Cost would be closer to $10,000 than $5,000.

3. Fix the axle where it was. 

Most vehicles that cross the Simpson do it in 4 or 5 days. They are limited because of their ability to carry food and water in addition to the large fuel requirement. We had no such restrictions, so we ordered a new axle from Melbourne via sat phone and waited. The axle took 5 days to get to Birdsville by post and then our friends drove in, picked it up and brought it back to us. That was a 3 day round trip.

In the mean time, we relaxed and enjoyed the desert for an extra 8 days.

When the axle arrived, it was a 10 minute job to fit it and we were on our way. The repair cost us our mate's fuel plus dinner in the pub at Birdsville.

P1100248E.jpg

P1100261cE.jpg

Cheers,

Peter



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OKA196, 4x4 'C' Class, DIY, self contained motorhome. 880W of solar, 400Ah of AGMs, 280L water, 280L fuel. http://tinyurl.com/OKA196xtMotorhome
 

 

KJB


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Do not spend time and money trying to make someone else responsible for the break and the repair - just fix it and get on with life......Good story.....that is what made Australia what is used to be.    



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KJB wrote:

Do not spend time and money trying to make someone else responsible for the break and the repair - just fix it and get on with life......Good story.....that is what made Australia what is used to be.    


 As it turned out, the axle I broke was supplied second hand by the same bloke who supplied the new replacement.

It had broken in an unusual place and there were signs that there was a weakness in it where it broke.

The supplier did not charge me for the new axle. I paid the postage to Birdsville.

He gets all my business..... smile

Cheers,

Peter



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KayCeeT wrote:

Hi all, I am yet to become an active grey nomad, but this is my dream / goal / bucket list, call it what you will but I will not be defeated wink I am a 60 year old female and will be hitting the road solo when it happens. I will only have enough in Super to purchase a van, which will be my home, and tow vehicle. My plan is to travel on a pension. Do you think this is achievable please? I would love to hear any thoughts or suggestions but please be kind. Also I am currently thinking maybe a 20 - 21ft van, do any solo lady nomads have any thoughts on this please? Any other information / tips / suggestions etc. gratefully received. Thanks in advance.


 Hi kayCee, i know ladies who live in their hiace vans and i have lived in my caravan solo for months at a time too But parked up On a farm. 

we have a caravan as there is strop and i. We need 2 tvs. If i were on my own full time,  i would buy a hiace or something similar and fit it out with solar and 12 volt. My friend has this and she has lived very happily in her hiace van for many years. I think a caravan would be too difficult for me On my own. travelling on a pension is very doable. We have lived in our van 5 years Full time. We free camp, housesit, showgrounds, caravan parks , depending wherever we go. Enjoy.



-- Edited by the rocket on Sunday 26th of July 2020 11:58:18 PM

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Hi KayCee,

I strongly recommend not rushing into buying a caravan, given your financial circumstances. My advice is to hire a fully self contained motor home for a few weeks. Their is a glut of motor homes for rental at the moment due to the international covid travel restrictions. Most motor homes are now 70 percent off the normal day/week rates with free mileage. For example the attached van available is under $990 for 3 weeks.

https://rentals.budgetcampervans.com/search/3%7C469772%7C469772%7C20200830%7C20200920%7CAU%7C60%7CZ%7Cen%7CAU%7C473149?

 

Then you can travel around your state, not sure where you are located, but if it isn't NSW or Vic, you can travel around and firstly get a feeling for traveling life on the road, secondly, you can speak with a lot of experienced camper van, caravan, roof topper people who you can ask questions about their kits in person. Then you can return your motor home and after your trip have a more solid understanding of what you are looking for. Then you are ready to go out and buy.

I trust this helps, let me know how you go biggrin

 

Kirsty, Cheif Problem Solver for Grey Nads



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K.Dee


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All Post Offices have a 1 page form for a- Registration Payment Card.You fill out & show D.L identity proof.0 cost.In 2 weeks you'll get mailed a small card..You put payments of $40++ on it until yr rego amount..When bill comes you take both to any P.O & they scan & receipt your rego bill-- as paid..Keep stored yr receipts to know what $$$  yr upto,then stop.I pay my $295 bill in 8 weeks & am always 3-4 months ahead before bill.. 



-- Edited by Erilala on Tuesday 18th of August 2020 03:43:01 PM

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You can also get a Rego Payment Card from any P.O...  A 1 page  form & ID,& a card is mailed to you in 2 weeks.Payments of $40+++ made anytime @ P.O till Rego amount is reached,Easy & costs 0.



-- Edited by Erilala on Tuesday 18th of August 2020 04:54:24 PM

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Sheesh to think I helped a guy fix his clutch on a Toyota Cruiser on the Nullarbor. 2 litre bottle of coke fixed it good enough to get to garage . Like things dont break down no matter what Type ? Even new !! I find the security of motorhome . Plus either has stuff packed outside . Theres the issue of theft if leaving things behind ? Most make comments , have never owned or used ? Then theres so many different combinations ?? Some may think either is too large To drive etc ? I would suggest hiring either for a few weeks ?

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Hi kaycee,

Ive bought a toyota hiace and im looking at doing 3 month trips at a time ,i have a lil cottage near bundaberg that i live in and have done a fair bit of travelling before but this time on my own ,which will be a challenge im going to have to learn lots ive never changed a tyre before so plenty of practice to do and other things .
Looking forward to seeing your purchase, i myself would never tow a van ,im a believer in being able to dash from my bed to the front seat and drive off just in case .

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glassies



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"And as for the concept of shadowing the repair mechanic! Tell that to Workcover in these overly safety conscious days."

That is exactly what I did in Tasmania when I was experiencing intermittent fuel starvation in my Nissan UD Truck AKA Chez MOAB these last four years. 

I was on the books as a "work experience" trainee. I had Workers comp if anything weird happened. Work Safe legit tottlay covered.

Pics of my temporary Boss and my Leading Hand. I cooked the boys some lunch. Godd   job I knew how to roll a smoke. Never know what skills might stand you in good stead. TBH I do like a convivial gasper once in a while.

DSCN0799.JPG

 

Some time later and a few degrees of lattitude higher.

 

DSCN0925.JPG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



-- Edited by MOAB on Thursday 3rd of September 2020 10:20:12 PM



-- Edited by MOAB on Thursday 3rd of September 2020 10:21:34 PM

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Peter n Margret that story is exactly on point with how folks like us need to think. Kudos.



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Dont think they will let you get away with what I got away with. This business is utterly Tasmanian (saints and scholars) and I would take them any where on the planet. For preference.. Even Germany ...


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msg wrote:

KayCeeT, Travelling on a pension can be quite difficult. I try to do it. I usually end up spending my old age pension plus about a thousand. Given that I don't smoke, drink, or eat out (not allowed to due to medical condition) and have a fully equipped van to live off grid comfortably you will need to think carefully how you are going to go about it.

Plus, in 7 yrs time, things could have changed dramatically.

I have been travelling for 9 yrs now and really notice the differences. The emphasis nowadays is on self contained so you at least need a port a potty, there are less off grid camps, caravan park fees have doubled, water is harder to come by and quite often towns are not as RV friendly. And now COVID has put a spanner in the works. Who knows what its going to be like in the future.


 Hi msg, is the extra 1000 yearly or monthly.



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 Hi Rocket,

My bank account decreases by about a thousand over the six or seven months I am away. I like to think I am a reasonably thrifty person but still have whatever I want and not be too extravagant. I free camp 90% of the time. So just small donations there.

Some of the $1000 would be maintenance on van, something always needs fixing,

Then there are a whole lot of costs before I go. Rego, Tyres, improvements, "just in cases", insurance, and stocking the van,

This time, I will need 4 new tyres. I want a CO2 detector, maybe a new microwave and the linen should be replaced.

Last time the batteries gave out (first time since I started) Son replaced them with lithium. They are great and I have so much more power (no more worries there)

So, I may not spend all my pension and I may even save a bit while away, but, taking into account all the before and after costs it can cost a bit.

Now I'm not complaining about these costs they are a necessary part of being able to travel for six or seven months a year and also ensures I have a relatively trouble free time as much as possible.



-- Edited by msg on Saturday 12th of September 2020 12:22:45 PM



-- Edited by msg on Saturday 12th of September 2020 12:23:41 PM

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Hi kaycee i will be doing the exact same thing ive split from my hubby we went round with out 22foot van but if it were me by myself 1st thing i thought of was safety how can i get to my car from van when i need to escape plus the fact i dont know how to tow ! So i would do as somebody said buy a mobile home i couldnt afford one so i purchased a toyota hiace and ive decked it out plus i have all the camping needs shower tent etc and my big adventure starts next june to lawn hill ive been all through the gulf and nt b4 but never called into lawn hill .
My next venture will also be birdsville hotel ive always wanted a shot of my car outside the pub, i hope you enjoy which ever situation u buy. But as much as its not happened to me i do know a lady had to get into her drivers seat and speed off ,so safety is the biggest issue for me

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glassies



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As you can see - many conflicting beliefs on what is best.

Athough we currently tow a much smaller 'van' than you are considering I would agree that a campervan/ motorhome would be a far better option, for a single person than a caravan. Much quicker & easier to set up, & to leave if you felt the need to if circumstances around you made you feel uncomfortable. (Get into the walkthrough cab & drive away rather than the whole process of hitching up & leaving).

For folk who predominantly stay in caravan parks the ability to unhitch & go off sight seeing is attractive, but if predominantly free camping regularly leaving the caravan behind may not feel so secure.

We prefer to wake up in wonderful places than to be day visitors to them so having a vehicle which can take you to those places with your accommodation makes sense. A 4wd camper/small motorhome (or a small off road van like ours which can go anywhere the 4wd tow vehicle goes). 4wd is not essential, but it does get you to more places with a sense of security even if you only use the 4wd capability once in a blue moon. Even a solid 2wd motorhome with good ground clearance (Eg. a Coaster or similar) will get you to many places that most caravanners can only day visit without their van, or that many would not take their 'off the shelf' 'white box' motorhomes to.

Packing up a small camper or motorhome is not a big deal & far less bother than reversing, hitching & unhitching ..... although I suppose you do get used to whatever you choose.

Our 'van' is actually a hard top camper trailer with a tent extension. I am not suggesting something like that as an option for you, but it has been home for the two of us on the road for the past 3 years. The point though is that you really do not need a lot of space or 'stuff' with you. (We do miss the ability to cook inside in inclement weather though).

As we age some things don't get easier. We are now 62 & 63 & have a variety of aches, pains etc & find lifting, for example harder than we used to. I most certainly would not want a 21' Van to maneuvre around. If I were to buy a caravan it would be something small - 13' -15' max & lightweight. But having previously owned a motorhome I know which is easiest to drive & to camp in.

As for costs, regardless of motorhome, campervan or caravan -  there is no escaping the fact that larger inevitably means higher running costs & other costs of ownership. Folk often mistakenly believe that the longer the journey the bigger the accommodation needs to be.  Experienced folk generally suggest that you go with the smallest you can manage in,  & those who don't are fairly likely to be basing their recommendation upon their need to justify their own decisions.

The post above from 'Glassies' makes a great deal of sense.

Best wishes for your decision making.



-- Edited by Cuppa on Wednesday 14th of October 2020 05:59:56 PM



-- Edited by Cuppa on Wednesday 14th of October 2020 06:03:19 PM



-- Edited by Cuppa on Wednesday 14th of October 2020 06:10:38 PM

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In slight contradiction to Moab & Peter, whilst we have experienced living in the motorhome in the yard of the repairer as they describe, we did also experience not having our motorhome for a number of weeks whilst it was in to have the motor replaced in Katherine, NT. All was not lost though, in fact far from it. We found our RAC 'Total Cover' to have been an excellent investment. All of our accommodation costs were covered, as was a hire car for much of the period. And easy to arrange.
Last year we availed ourselves of their service again after breaking our rear suspension & having to wait 3 weeks for relpacements to be freighted to Kununurra, WA. This time we remained in our camper on a powered site, but all site fees, & car hire was again covered by the RAC. Don't leave home without it!

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