check out our comfortable cushions check out the new remote control Jockey Wheel SmartBar Ampfibian
Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: New Solo member


Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 20
Date:
New Solo member


Hi, my name is Vicki. I am new to this forum and Grey Nomads, although have been getting the newsletter now for a couple of months. I plan to travel solo, not sure when, but within next 1-3 years I hope. I am a nurse, and hoping to be able to work with an agency I work with now, as I travel or do some other bits n pieces of work.

I don't really want to drive a van, or tow a caravan, and am wondering if getting a 4WD (not too huge) and being able to sleep in it, (in a caravan park for instance), use their amenities, and perhaps have an annexe made or similar, or even a small tent, would work?

I am hoping someone can give me some ideas. I am only 5 ft tall (or small) and don't want to be trying to deal with caravans or campervans, and I want some freedom of where I can travel too. Have seen too many news programs of people with accidents and caravans and just don't feel confident. Has anyone else travelled this way. 10 years ago I moved from Adelaide to Alice Springs, and at the time owned a Hyundai Excel hatchback. I managed to fit what I needed in the back, and also be able to lay one seat back and sleep in it. I also had a swag which was great when camping out in the McDonnell Ranges once I was living in Alice.  Would love to hear from others and what might work, nor not!!!

Cheers and enjoy reading the forums and newsletter. Looking forward to some freedom again.

Vicki



__________________


Chief one feather

Status: Offline
Posts: 16526
Date:

Welcome to the gang Vixter, enjoy here and out in the playground.

It matters not, what you travel in, it is your choice only. If you are comfy in the car only then go for it. You can get tent like structures that fit the back of a station wagon or 4x4 like cars so maybe look into that as an option also.

Keep Safe on the roads.

__________________

Live Life On Your Terms

DOUG  Chief One Feather  (Losing feathers with age)

TUG.......2014 Holden LT Colorado Twin Cab Ute with Canopy

DEN....... 2014 "Chief" Arrow CV  (with some changes)

 



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1571
Date:

How about an ex rental Bushcamper. Would be ideal I think.

 

I was thinking of getting one purely as a fishing vehicle to get me to remote fishing spots. My better half soon put that idea into touch.



__________________

Bryan



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 5066
Date:

Toyota Troop-carriers are often made into bush campers as are many smaller Trucks like Hi-Ace and of course the ever present Toyota Coaster Buses all are small, manoeuvreable, and economical. Many backpackers are buying smaller soft-roaders like RAV4 and CRV's - with an addition of a Mattress, Porta-Pottie, shower tent, small gas cooker and a awning on the roof racks they are seeing the World in relative comfort.
Go and look at some "Wicked Campers" or "KIA campers" to see how regular road vehicles are transformed into campers to get some ideas.

__________________

Possum; AKA:- Ali El-Aziz Mohamed Gundawiathan

Sent from my imperial66 typewriter using carrier pigeon, message sticks and smoke signals.



Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 20
Date:

Thanks so much Possum3. Great ideas, so many alternatives I of course haven't even thought of. I also don't mind the idea of RAV4 with the additions.....I know I just wouldn't handle a big car/4WD, even though I have driven those huge 4WD outback when I worked in Alice as part of my job to Aboriginal communities, with Sat phones etc., I can't see me constantly driving one every day. I will check online at the others you mentioned and of course the RAV 4 I have always liked them when I see them on the road. Cheers again. Vicki

__________________


Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 20
Date:

Hi Bryan, ok haven't heard of a Bushcamper but will look them up. I don't fish, but sounds like they are pretty much able to go to a few

rugged places, so will have a look. Bad luck about you not being able to get one to go fishing....lol Cheers for now, Vicki



__________________


Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 20
Date:

Hi Doug

Thanks so much, loving the idea of being able to add tent like structures to a vehicle, sounds like a goer to me....I think I need to get to the next time they have a Caravan and Camping show here in Adelaide to have a good look at what is available. I just dread being stuck in the middle of nowhere with a massive 4WD , van or such with a flat tyre or worse and not having the strength, height etc to help get myself out of strife. Sounds great. Cheers Vicki



__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1115
Date:

Bushcamper is an offshoot of Britz Maui - hire campervans.

If you could get used to the idea of driving a Toyota Troopy - they convert into great little campers, or you could buy ex rental one already converted.

My friend has one she got converted into a camper. Has a poptop roof. Very versatile for travel but comfortable enough for her if she has to hole up somewhere in bad weather.

I guess the question with the small vehicles is how much inconvenience you are prepared to accept - consider things like cooking if you do not have any facility to do so in the vehicle and you get stuck in a wet spell. Also some of the smaller, less rugged vehicles are perhaps a bit more likely to strand you somewhere than the tougher ones.

__________________

wendyv

 http://wendyviney.blogspot.com/

https://thisadventurousage.com/



Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 20
Date:

Thanks Wendy
I guess I would have to try driving them to see. I used to work in a place where I sometimes had to transport people using a Toyota, although don't think it was quite as big as the Troopy. I see what you are saying though!!!! I guess my main worry is parking....and reversing lol, living in the city makes it a hit and miss affair, so I guess it would be a matter of getting/finding places to park if I am in a town to shop, where I can park in an easy spot and walk further perhaps. I guess that is one of my issues. And like anything, I suppose you get used to driving larger vehicles. And yes, of course if it is wet or stormy etc., I suppose I might want to stay awhile, or just stay awhile in a nice spot, so you want a bit of room to move around in. My other issue , and I have travelled alone to the N.T. to live, and to NSW, but is there many issues regarding women and safety? Or does it just mean you need to camp in camping grounds etc., where other people are around. I travelled to Alice then Darwin just after the Peter Falconio issue, and whilst there was a slightly eerie feeling and people were a little wary, there was no real issues. Guess my mind is just going a bit overboard at the moment.
Thanks for your advice. I will also check out your BlogSpot. Cheers Vicki

__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 5066
Date:

Vixter, Look at roofrack.com.au/products/shade-awnings/shade-awnings.html just to get an idea of what is available - If lucky you can sometimes see them at sale prices from Anaconda type outlets. All of the pictured units here would fit any of the smaller soft roaders.


__________________

Possum; AKA:- Ali El-Aziz Mohamed Gundawiathan

Sent from my imperial66 typewriter using carrier pigeon, message sticks and smoke signals.



Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 20
Date:

Thanks checked them out, some really interesting styles.....getting very confused now, so much to choose from. I just realised after checking online today that I have missed the 2016 Caravan and Camping Show in Adelaide....darn.....!!!!!

__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1115
Date:

There are so many travellers on the roads these days that going from point to point is pretty secure. Same can be said about free camping in the most popular spots - it is more a matter of whether you can find a space!
For places a bit off the beaten track, I think you will find that you make friends as you go along and will find others who want to join together to visit such places.
In most towns, there is usually a supermarket type car park where it is easier to park something of size.
For security, you can carry a sat phone or an epirb or use something like go spot.
If you join the CMCA, they have local group (chapter) rallies where you can meet fellow travellers, and also have a Solos section that a number of sole women travellers belong to. Well worth the joining fee. They also have a market place section where members sell used motorhomes. And a forum where you can get info.


__________________

wendyv

 http://wendyviney.blogspot.com/

https://thisadventurousage.com/



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 362
Date:

Hey Vicki....welcome to this friendly. helpful forum. I often travel alone! I chose my slide on for two reasons.....one...didn't want to tow a van & 2.....my boat is a must. Maybe a slide on would suit you?

__________________

Making Memories.

Take nothing but photo's.

Leave nothing but footprints.



Newbie

Status: Offline
Posts: 4
Date:

Howdy Vicki

My name is Bob i have a Toyota troopie pop top, they are a very good vehicle, the only negative is if i am in a city they do not go in the car parks and they do not fit on the ghan. i traveled through the Kimberley for 7 months comfortable. If i can be any help let me know.

Regards Bob



Attachments
__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 930
Date:

Hi Vicki.
What ever you choose you will probably change after a while.
Before you set off it is hard to get your head around this travelling bit.
We are all different so look at all ideas.
Most of us travel very short distances and not very often so after a short while the travelling is not a problem.
My average is about 5000 to 6000 Kms a year with many stops of a week to a month.
Average daily trip would be 100Ks and the longest is never over 300Kms and the shortest was 17 Kms .
What you finish up doing could be entirely different to what you start out doing but it all depends on YOU.
Most don't go near large cities and many small towns allow parking for larger rigs and there is always shopping centers with drive through for the longer vehicles.
I think there is a lot of work for nurses especially with remote area experience, BUT do you want to work still as there is many areas you can spend your time if it is just for the pleasure and the rewards of helping. There are many charities what you will get great pleasure from helping if that is your thing. Blazeaid is one as well as a charity in Qld giving support to rural farmers as well as just spending times on farms on a one on one basis helping with the farm work and family daily life. Look around there are many areas like this if you just want to be helpful and happy with the feel good result.
If you go too small you may never be comfortable and also you may not be able to stay long in bush environment but again it will be your choice.
Many stay away from caravan parks and prefer the company and security of bush camps.
Regards
Brian



__________________

11 Mtr house Boat based at Mannum hoping to travel up the Murray as far as I can get then drift back again



Newbie

Status: Offline
Posts: 1
Date:

Hi Vicki, Read your blog with interest as I was in exactly the same position 2 years ago and ended up buying a short wheel base Ford Transit van which I found absolutely ideal for a solo traveller as it gave me all the usual creature comforts (shower toilet etc) without impacting on manouvrability. Its so easy to drive, just like a car really, in fact I prefer driving the van to my little Mazda 2!. I just finished the big lap in December last year but as I'm no longer in the solo category I have actually got it on the market at the moment so if you are interested at all let me know. Im in the Nelson Bay area.



__________________
msg


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1101
Date:

Hi Vicki,

I am also a solo traveller. Like Ziggy I have a transit van also. I frequent out of the way and remote places, done the big lap and clocked up about 90k so far. The only repairs have been a new set of tyres and wheel bearings to one wheel. Apparently it is common problem.

As ziggy said, its easy to drive and parks in a normal carspace.  Good on fuel too. I get about 10lt/100ks.  If you can, look at a turbo diesel one built after 2005.  



-- Edited by msg on Tuesday 26th of April 2016 03:31:08 PM

__________________


Newbie

Status: Offline
Posts: 1
Date:

info/pics of your van please

thanks, Frank



__________________
msg


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1101
Date:

My transit has a KEA Freedom fitout. All the lux things. Shower/Toilet, microwave, 90ltr fridge, air-con. stereo, TV. 100ltr water tank & 80ltr grey water tank. I have added extra solar from original and an extended internet aerial on the roof gives me a connection in most areas. Another helpful device is the hands free UHF. Leave no trace certified. Manual, 6 gears, High top, Turbo diesel 2008 model.

__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Tweet this page Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us
Purchase Grey Nomad bumper stickers Read our daily column, the Nomad News The Grey Nomad's Guidebook