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Post Info TOPIC: Electric Power Leads


Veteran Member

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Electric Power Leads


I have noticed that some folks coil up the Electric Power Leads, does this increase voltage to a point where it can cause damage any sensitive electrical equipment in the caravan?

What's your thoughts.



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Michael C

 



Guru

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As long as there is good airflow, there shouldn't be a problem.

https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/192923/why-is-it-dangerous-use-a-coiled-extension-cord



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Senior Member

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No voltage issue, but there is some heat developed with every electrical lead and if it is heavily loaded and coiled too tight that heat can become destructively high, melt the insulation and cause a fire.
Always uncoil extension leads when in use.
Cheers,
Peter

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Guru

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Damn good advice there. I always make sure the cable is uncoiled, especially when running the air conditioner on the Generator.

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Veteran Member

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Yes, great advice.

Thanks

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Michael C

 



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Steel Dog wrote:

I have noticed that some folks coil up the Electric Power Leads, does this increase voltage to a point where it can cause damage any sensitive electrical equipment in the caravan?


 As described above, any damage that occurred, occurs in the lead. The resistance in the lead causes a voltage drop along the length of the lead. If you multiply that voltage drop by the current flowing in the lead, you can calculate the power being lost in the lead and thus the heat generated in the lead. If you coil the lead tightly you prevent the heat escaping. This is what caused the insulation melting and the destruction of the lead.

The maximum current rating of a lead is based upon a maximum of 5% voltage at the socket end of the lead. With our 230 V system this equates to 11.5 V drop through a lead at its maximum allowable length for a given size of cable at 16 A. If you have a 25-metre lead and yuou are using your maximum allowable power, you will be losing 184 W of power in your lead. That is not an insignificant loss of power and if you have your lead on a reel then you can destroy it in very quick time.



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NSW Central Coast.

 



Guru

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Looking at HPM website.

 

Domestic extension lead 1mm˛

Heavy duty lead 1mm˛

Extra heavy duty lead 1.5mm˛

Extra heavy duty caravan lead 1.5mm˛

 

My Arri light extension lead 4.0mm˛

 

If you want to minimise cable losses & reduce heat, get thicker cross sectional area of wire.



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