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Post Info TOPIC: Tow car for camper trailer.


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Tow car for camper trailer.


Hi,  I thought it best to start a new topic to keep advice related to my specific requirements, not that this is unusual but it's just less confusing.

 

I have a Marlin Camper, 4WD trailer body on a beefed up but not 4WD suspension.

I do not intend to take the trailer on serious 4WD tracks, but do day trips from more accessible base camps.

I have no interest in recreational 4WD for it's own sake, but I do want to be able to access areas less travelled, for fishing, sightseeing, day walks etc.

Yes, the trailer will be going over unsealed roads just not seriously bad ones.

The trailer is un-braked so max loading is only 600kg, so we do not need a huge heavy duty 4x4 tow vehicle, In fact my wife will not drive a full size 4x4.

Also, we want to be able to lift kayaks onto the roof without that becoming a major drama.  Basically, I want something that reliable & reasonably easy to manage, not heavy painful work.

I don't think there are any medium size true 4WDs, so I suppose this is leading toward an SUV, though I'd prefer something with low range that can handle a diagonal pin situations reasonably well.  I believe many of the SUVs have torque control systems, some better than others.  Maybe that's enough?

I have no idea what is available on the market or where to start with this decision.

My budget would be the 2nd hand market, What's a reasonable budget for something reasonable?

Advice please?

I wouldn't mind hiring an agent to select & broker the deal on my behalf, if anyone does that, anyone know?

 

Ta in advance,

Ken



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Guru

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Consider a Suzuki Vitara. www.carsguide.com.au/suzuki/vitara/reviews

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Possum; AKA:- Ali El-Aziz Mohamed Gundawiathan

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The Vitrara is an excellent suggestion from Possum3.

They are a much underrated 4WD.



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"I beseech you in the bowels of Christ think it possible you may be mistaken"

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Suzuki Grand Vitara an even better choice I reckon. True and proper 4WD...ie...has low range...and in constant 4 WD every other time. Good ground clearance....strong body and chassis.....good fuel range...in petrol auto only on late models. We have one of the last sold in OZ from new....and these things are an absolute hoot to drive....handle like on rails ...good suspension, brakes, and pretty comfy as well.

Oh ...and 1700 kg tow rated....not bad for a smallish suv really

HTH

 

Cheers  Keith



-- Edited by Keith P on Saturday 1st of January 2022 08:33:26 PM

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Sailfish wrote:

Hi,  I thought it best to start a new topic to keep advice related to my specific requirements, not that this is unusual but it's just less confusing.

 

I have a Marlin Camper, 4WD trailer body on a beefed up but not 4WD suspension.

I do not intend to take the trailer on serious 4WD tracks, but do day trips from more accessible base camps.

I have no interest in recreational 4WD for it's own sake, but I do want to be able to access areas less travelled, for fishing, sightseeing, day walks etc.

Yes, the trailer will be going over unsealed roads just not seriously bad ones.

The trailer is un-braked so max loading is only 600kg, so we do not need a huge heavy duty 4x4 tow vehicle, In fact my wife will not drive a full size 4x4.

Also, we want to be able to lift kayaks onto the roof without that becoming a major drama.  Basically, I want something that reliable & reasonably easy to manage, not heavy painful work.

I don't think there are any medium size true 4WDs, so I suppose this is leading toward an SUV, though I'd prefer something with low range that can handle a diagonal pin situations reasonably well.  I believe many of the SUVs have torque control systems, some better than others.  Maybe that's enough?

I have no idea what is available on the market or where to start with this decision.

My budget would be the 2nd hand market, What's a reasonable budget for something reasonable?

Advice please?

I wouldn't mind hiring an agent to select & broker the deal on my behalf, if anyone does that, anyone know?

 

Ta in advance,

Ken


 My choice would be Subaru Forester, with a budget of $20 000, ride manners of a car, very reliable, good longevity, good service intervals and happy in the suburbs or out in the national parks.

Ps, this section of the forum is not a the place to be as this is for "recommendations mechanics or czravan parks".

I would recommend putting the post in "General".



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Radar wrote:
Ps, this section of the forum is not a the place to be as this is for "recommendations mechanics or caravan parks".

I would recommend putting the post in "General".


 Au Contraire, - Mechanics and Caravan Parks are Individual Subsets under the Recommendation Heading - IMO The correct place to ask or give recommendations is "this" section of the Forum.



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Possum; AKA:- Ali El-Aziz Mohamed Gundawiathan

Sent from my imperial66 typewriter using carrier pigeon, message sticks and smoke signals.



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Possum3 wrote:
Radar wrote:
Ps, this section of the forum is not a the place to be as this is for "recommendations mechanics or caravan parks".

I would recommend putting the post in "General".


 Au Contraire, - Mechanics and Caravan Parks are Individual Subsets under the Recommendation Heading - IMO The correct place to ask or give recommendations is "this" section of the Forum.


 I go back into my corner.



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Suzuki Vitara, as a current owner of a 2012 model, and 4 times owner of such a vehicle, you cannot go wrong if you can get a good one. All of my previous have been brand new, excepting this current one, as was not cashed up enough for a new one. My last one 2001 Grand Vitara V6, my daughter has it , I put 385,000km on it and she has added165,000km to it. It has not been touched, only services, and a couple of belts, ( wish I still had it, my daughter wont part with it). Get a good one, you won't regret it. Also I used a broker to buy it, helped me a lot, JACK Millage he is at Advantage  brokers on the Gold Coast QLD







-- Edited by Bicyclecamper on Sunday 2nd of January 2022 04:34:12 PM

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Ta all, I'll start looking into the Vitara option.

So, how exactly does one go about finding a broker with the expertise to purchase a good and reliable car?
I've never done that before.

Ken

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Try bathurstsuzuki.com.au/book-a-test-drive and see what they can do.

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Possum; AKA:- Ali El-Aziz Mohamed Gundawiathan

Sent from my imperial66 typewriter using carrier pigeon, message sticks and smoke signals.



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Sailfish wrote:

So, how exactly does one go about finding a broker with the expertise to purchase a good and reliable car?
I've never done that before.


Frankly: these days with good consumer law in place buying from an established dealer is a very good bet. They simply do not want problems and difficulties with the cars they sell and will generally sort out any issues without an argument. They know what they are doing and will not buy cars with problems and if they do, to do a trade-in perhaps, they simply move the rubbish out through the auctions.

I would not waste money on a broker... if you can find one?

 



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"I beseech you in the bowels of Christ think it possible you may be mistaken"

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Senior Member

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Just be aware that there are 2 types of Suzuki Vitara. One is just called that ...a Vitara....which is basically a east west front wheel drive sedan with a bit of ground clearance...altho some models in these are also all wheel drive.
The other one is the Grand Vitara...which is a true 4wd wagon ...built a lot stronger and more capable ...which is the one I have. They are discontinued in OZ now...I got one of the last....so may bring good prices for any secondhand that are in good nick....but still worth it IMO.

The last time I got ours serviced at Mumford Suzuki in Dubbo ....they had a pretty neat silver one on the lot ...and another in the workshop undergoing some maintenance...and that was about a month ago....so they are out there

Cheers Keith



-- Edited by Keith P on Tuesday 4th of January 2022 10:26:58 PM

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 Besides looking at the towing capacity of your proposed car, you will also have to look at the tow ball weight. I found that to be the limiting factor when I was looking for a vehicle for towing a camping trailer. 

 

Having said that, and I don't know the towing capacity nor the tow ball weight of a Subaru, I was very impressed by the off road capabilities of a Subaru all wheel or 4Wd vehicle that I hired back in the 80's. I don't remember the model but it was fully loaded with gear and we drove back onto a gravel road through, a supposed, puddle. The puddle was very deep and part of the tabledrain and the front two wheels dropped into it so that they were suspended by the Subaru's floor.

 

I thought that we were stuck because, from previous experience, a Land Cruiser would *not* back out of that. I put the Subaru in reverse and it backed right out, pulling the front wheels back onto harder ground. I was stunned. 



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Buzz Lightbulb wrote:

 Besides looking at the towing capacity of your proposed car, you will also have to look at the tow ball weight. I found that to be the limiting factor when I was looking for a vehicle for towing a camping trailer. 

 


 Hi Buzz

Long time owner of Subarus, Brumby, Sportwagon, Impressa STI, Outback. 

Braked trailer 1200 kgs. without being to technical. 

Our camper trailer weighed in at approx 800 kgs with over ride brakes, slow over some of the mountain ranges but don't recall being overtaken by anyone towing a heavy trailer in over 25000 ks of travel.



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Radar wrote:
Buzz Lightbulb wrote:

 Besides looking at the towing capacity of your proposed car, you will also have to look at the tow ball weight. I found that to be the limiting factor when I was looking for a vehicle for towing a camping trailer. 

 


 Hi Buzz

Long time owner of Subarus, Brumby, Sportwagon, Impressa STI, Outback. 

Braked trailer 1200 kgs. without being to technical. 

Our camper trailer weighed in at approx 800 kgs with over ride brakes, slow over some of the mountain ranges but don't recall being overtaken by anyone towing a heavy trailer in over 25000 ks of travel.


 My old diesel Golf could easily tow a camper trailer except, the tow ball weight was too heavy. Hence, I couldn't legally tow a camper trailer with the Golf.

 

I'm not sure what the legal tow ball weight is of the Subarus you mention. 



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Buzz Lightbulb wrote:
Radar wrote:
Buzz Lightbulb wrote:

 Besides looking at the towing capacity of your proposed car, you will also have to look at the tow ball weight. I found that to be the limiting factor when I was looking for a vehicle for towing a camping trailer. 

 


 Hi Buzz

Long time owner of Subarus, Brumby, Sportwagon, Impressa STI, Outback. 

Braked trailer 1200 kgs. without being to technical. 

Our camper trailer weighed in at approx 800 kgs with over ride brakes, slow over some of the mountain ranges but don't recall being overtaken by anyone towing a heavy trailer in over 25000 ks of travel.


 My old diesel Golf could easily tow a camper trailer except, the tow ball weight was too heavy. Hence, I couldn't legally tow a camper trailer with the Golf.

 

I'm not sure what the legal tow ball weight is of the Subarus you mention. 


 The tow ball legal weight would need checking for any individual car.

The tow bar on my Outback was of the flat tongue type which was good for 800 kgs braked but if I replaced the tow bar with a square retrieval type the car could tow by memory 1200 kgs braked with 10% on the ball. 



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Vehicle size. Full size versus smaller. When I did my ambulance driving training. The police instructor asked us to guess the difference in size between a Rolls Royce and a Volkswagen Beetle. Not a single person got it right. Everyone said the a Rolls was at least 2 metres longer than a Beetle. Not so grasshopper. Rolls Royce less than 36 inches longer. So what people perceive as a full size and smaller size 4x4 is literally a matter of inches. The female ambulance crews outnumber the men now and they all drive full size ambulances with ease.

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