check out our comfortable cushions check out the new remote control Jockey Wheel Lithium Batteries Learn more about Sat Phone Sales Learn more about our special Townsvile rates Learn more about our Pet Travel Accessories
Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: TPMS


Veteran Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 37
Date:
TPMS


Hi All

I recently purchased a Safety Dave TPMS system for the tug and the van. All worked well until one of the batteries in the caravan wheel monitor died. Easy to change . BUT while I was removing the unit from the wheel I noticed a happy face on the rim around the valve area. On closer inspection I found that the TPMS had been flapping around and hitting the rim. When the wheel is stationary the unit is at least 1 cm from the rim. This concerned me because the rubber portion of the valve stem has started to split/crack  in several places close to the rim. For safety and my peace of mind I have had all the valve stems replaced with new ones. Not a big cost at $10 per wheel.

I had been driving along a unsealed road which had small corrugations before hand. This is what probably caused the flapping, At least I hope so. I will monitor this more closely from now on.

So has any one else had this sort of problem with the valve flapping around when a external TPMS has been fitted.

Also has anyone had the tyre deflate because of this cracking of the valve stem.

If so what can be done to remedy this problem of the valve flapping because of the extra weight of the TPMS unit .

 

cheers

Kiwimagic.



Attachments
__________________


Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 299
Date:

G'day Kiwi, on lcool forum someone fitted some 12/13mm soft poly irrigation pipe as a sleeve, prior to fitting sender unit, they said it was a good fix. cheers Craig

__________________


Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 19
Date:

Hi Kiwimagic,

I'm new at attaching pictures. My tyre dealer fitted new valve stems which failed due to the flapping, so we went back to the originals but as my M/home has duels, he fitted flexible extensions to help me check tyre pressures etc. He then found clamps as shown in the picture this page and also in the attachments.

Another method is to use cable ties (the tougher the better), to brace the cap from flapping.

Gets awkward on corrugated roads, so bad one of my units failed but after removing and reinstalling, came back to life.

I wouldn't be without TPMS. Takes the worry out of flat tyres and or blowouts. We had one of those (blowout).

Keep safe.IMG_2654.JPG



Attachments
__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 699
Date:

I currently do not have any TPM system on my vehicles but if I were to get a system where the sensors fitted to the end of the valve stems I would seriously consider metal valve stems.

Here are some for sale and metal stems are available in different sizes for car and truck (motorhome) rims.

http://www.ebay.com/bhp/metal-valve-stem

If you want to see them in the flesh before buying then Speed Shops and Custom wheel and tyre shops should be able to help you and they can fit them as well

No point having a TPMS if the valve can break off.....

Apology if anyone tried to open my first link. When I tested it, it was dodgy.... Now edited to eBay suppliers.






-- Edited by Dickodownunder on Saturday 17th of February 2018 11:54:30 AM

__________________

 

"Seek the truth or bury you head in the sand, both require some digging"


Geoff

Travel Safely



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 284
Date:

I have a TPMS system on my caravan and it works - well it displays something, exactly what I am not sure. It at least gives me a better picture of what is happening than simply driving along and waiting for a loud rumble to indicate that I have a flat tyre...When I disconnect the caravan and go exploring, the monitor screams at me because it is missing the caravan tyres, so I turned it off. WRONG! On one of my explorations, the corrugations were so bad that the sensor on the rear tyre of my 4WD unscrewed itself, thereby letting the air out of the tyre. I found it before any damage was done, but I had to change the tyre on a very difficult position, and because of my respiratory condition and the fact the tyres weigh heaps, it was over 2 hrs later that we were back on the road again. As I was putting the dead tyre onto the spare wheel position, my wife asked if the sensor would interfere with the spare wheel cover. I said "no", but on checking, I noted that the sensor was loose. We had looked at the dead tyre looking for cuts, nails etc, but could find nothing. Got back into town, and went to the local garage and inflated the dead tyre to 50 psi. Next morning it was still 50, so I refitted it to the car and all has been good since. Moral of the story - check that the tyre pressure sensors are screwed on tight, and check them regularly.



-- Edited by erad on Monday 19th of February 2018 04:17:21 PM

__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 699
Date:

As with most items you get what you pay for.
The TPMS system with the sensors inside the rim/tyre assembly are generally a bit more expensive but are not prone to damage like the system with the sensors fitted to the valve stems.
The final decision is personal.

__________________

 

"Seek the truth or bury you head in the sand, both require some digging"


Geoff

Travel Safely

KJB


Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 135
Date:

Maybe fit one  of these to each wheel -  Porsche used them for valve stem control at high speed . They were not expensive and just stuck on .Porsche Valve Stem Support 2.png



Attachments
__________________

KB



Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 19
Date:

The only thing I found with metal valve stems, the seals are critical. On corrugated or pot-holed bitumen roads where sudden jars can be so harsh as to break the seals, suddenly your pulling up to check why the TPMS is warning of deflation.

I had two different style of steel fittings, one had good seals, was brass in colour (fitted to the steering wheels) while the four (chrome style) fitted to the duals were replaced in under 100k's on our first trip because the seals needed tightening which was impossible because the tyre needed to be removed from the rim thus enabling a spanner to be applied on both sides to secure them. On closer inspection, the seals on the latter four appeared to distort so I had a tyre dealer replace all four stems with the original rubber style with no further seal problems. The front two have given no problems.

Rather a costly exercise but I kept all rear tyres inflated to the correct pressure (until the hot day increased the pressure above the tyre manufacturers recommended 70psi). I'm thinking of using nitrogen (which I use on my car), to control the pressure increase on hot days.

I'd be interested in thoughts of using nitrogen on a 4 tonne motorhome, with six tyres on the road and a couple of spares. 



__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 699
Date:

Hi BazzMann48
These are available which allow tightening from the outside.
With truck rims a lot will depend on what type of wheel you have.

m.ebay.com/itm/4-Pcs-bolt-in-black-metal-Replacement-Part-car-wheel-tyre-valves-stems-dust-caps-/222626552916

__________________

 

"Seek the truth or bury you head in the sand, both require some digging"


Geoff

Travel Safely



Veteran Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 37
Date:

Hi All

Those small braces as shown by KJB look to be the answer. Not sure where to get those So I have purchased some self adhesive rubber draft strip which is 15 mm high. 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/10mmx15mm-2M-Silicone-Rubber-Self-adhesive-Door-Window-Weather-Stripping-Brown/391948262101?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649

I will cut a short length and stick it under the valve stem and it should support the valve stem, sort of like the ones KJB has shown. I can then use a cable tie thru the hole and around the valve stem to stop it flopping around.

I will let you know how it works.

cheers

kiwimagic



__________________


Veteran Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 37
Date:

Hi All

After checking out the Porsche supports and noting the price ($10 each plus postage) I remembered I had some 1mm thick 10 x 40 aluminium angle lying around. So I made myself some supports, only charged myself a stubbie each. 

will see how they go next time out.

Cheers

Kiwimagic.



Attachments
__________________


Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 19
Date:

Nice work. I was thinking of using rubber shaped and glued in a similar style to your aluminium ones. Maybe a stubbie cap could be reworked.

As long is can be secured so as not to come loose and damage something else it may come into contact with.

Stay safe..



__________________


Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 19
Date:

Those look better than the ones I had. Might chase it up and carry as spares. 

If you look at the attached photo, the seal is damaged due to either being overtightened or under tightened.

 



-- Edited by BazzMann48 on Wednesday 21st of February 2018 04:29:03 PM

Attachments
__________________


Veteran Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 37
Date:

Not too sure about those solid stems, Seems to me that all the movement will be concentrated on the area where you need the best seal.



__________________


Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 19
Date:

I'm Sticking with the rubber variety. These can be supported if necessary.

Cheers, over and out.

PS: We used a coat hanger to hold the muffler on the Kombi from Broome back to Mt. Gambier. Maybe that trick will support the rubber stems..



-- Edited by BazzMann48 on Thursday 22nd of February 2018 02:57:10 PM

__________________


Veteran Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 37
Date:

Coat hangers and cable ties .where would we be without them.

 

cheers

Kiwimagic.



__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 782
Date:

Why don't you take it back to the supplier and get your money back as "not fit for purpose". Then maybe someone will make one that does not have these problems and is actually usable without all the work arounds that everyone all seem to accept as normal.

I am constantly amazed with what buyers seem to put up with from suppliers who sell goods that are not able to do what they claim it will do. Take it back and tell them that it is a useless piece of junk that is not usable as stands, but when they improve the design so that is viable you just may be interested.

,

Alan



-- Edited by Brenda and Alan on Friday 23rd of February 2018 12:35:21 AM

__________________


Veteran Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 37
Date:

Hi

Which part would I send back ??

Valve stem worked fine until the TPMS unit was attached.

TPMS unit works fine until road conditions get bumpy.

Wheel rims work OK.

So all parts work as they were designed too.

Support bracket took 10 min to make.

Not worth the trouble to send anything back.

cheers

kiwimagic



__________________


Guru

Status: Online
Posts: 8613
Date:

Kiwimagic wrote:

Hi

Which part would I send back ??

Valve stem worked fine until the TPMS unit was attached.

TPMS unit works fine   until road conditions get bumpy. cry hmm no

Wheel rims work OK.

So all parts work as they were designed too. ?? designed to break valve stems when connected and roads are bumpy?

Support bracket took 10 min to make.

Not worth the trouble to send anything back.

cheers

kiwimagic


Gday...

So four outta five is OK?

It seems that the TPMS, this type/style anyway, is only good if ya don't hit bumps.

DAMN ... now where can we find roads like that?

I, too, think they are 'not fit for purpose', given the experience/s stated here.

Cheers - John



__________________

2006 Discovery 3 TDV6 SE Auto - 2008 23ft Golden Eagle Hunter
Some people feel the rain - the others just get wet - Bob Dylan

Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Tweet this page Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us
Purchase Grey Nomad bumper stickers Read our daily column, the Nomad News The Grey Nomad's Guidebook