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Post Info TOPIC: Toyota Hiace - auto/manual and petrol/diesel??


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Toyota Hiace - auto/manual and petrol/diesel??


Hello everyone

I'm looking at buying a Hiace Campervan (2009 onwards) and would love to hear from previous and current owners about their thoughts on auto/manual and petrol/diesel. Love to hear from those especially who have owned/driven different combinations.†

They all have their pros and cons. My thoughts are:

Manual has more power over an auto.... but I do like "D" for go. Does the auto have enough power for a fully laden van?

Diesel - my only worry is the diesel particulate filter (DPF) clogging up if I don't get out on the highway enough. I'm a single female, so it would be my only vehicle, and I'm still working FT, so at present I mainly only putter to and from work. Altho' I could get a good drive in on every 2nd weekend maybe.†

Looking forward to your thoughts and experiences.



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Check out all the Hiaces since conception and get the full list of features en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_HiAce very interesting when you get to later models.

Remember a lot of these vans come into Australia as Grey Imports (vans originally used in Japan and exported after three years due to Govt Regulations) - In most cases there is nothing wrong with Grey Imports and they tend to be lower mileage than Original Aust imports. The downside is usually that parts have to be specifically imported if something goes amiss.

My personal choice would be a petrol/automatic - and I wouldn't consider a common rail diesel because of exorbitant cost of motor strip down if you get a load of crappy fuel and it get past the fuel filter.

If buying a camper van version ensure it is fitted with a camper conversion compliance plate - there are a lot of homemade campers that are not compliant which could cause problems when registering.

I used to own a diesel Mitsubishi 4WD van - I reckon I would still be driving it other than an altercation with an Emu. It was fitted with bull bars but it struck right on corner LH - Insurance Company wouldn't agree to repair so wrote it off.

Look at the WikiList decide what configuration would best suit - Hope to see you out there.


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Latter model autos are fine . Just be aware of servicing when it comes to exhaust and tow in sport mode depending on model ? Or not top Gear. Most transmission have high gearing for fuel economy . But not too great for durability as engine is labouring along . The choice is really what YOU want !! Auto‚s kick down better when towing !! Depending how you drive ?

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Whats out there


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Thanks for the link Possum3. I didn't think to look at Wiki.
Yeah, might be best to stick petrol .


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BEWARE! We bought a 1999 Petrol 5 speed Manuaal Camper van from a German couple. It was built by a mob that caters mainly backpackers. There was a constant smell of petrol in the van. Very strong if the van had been locked up for any length of time. We got our mechanic to check it out. It turned out that when they screwed the brackets into the floor for the seat/bed frame, the screws they used were too long and went straight into the fuel tank! We couldn't afford $800 for a new tank so got it plugged with 2 pack epoxy ex Supercheap Auto.

Emailed the company who built the thing but did not get a reply

Plus make sure you get it fully checked by your own mechanic before you nuy it, even if it has a RWC. We got stung and it has ended up costing us an extra $3000 to repair the thing.

Tyres/Radiator/Balljoints to name a few items.

At least we know it's roadworthy now (want to be after what we spent on it) and have built extra storage cabinets and fitted it to our liking. She flies and is a pleasure to drive. Just make sure you check the towing capacity of whatever you get because I don't think they have a very high rating.

Frank



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