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Post Info TOPIC: Road Train Etiquette


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Road Train Etiquette


The following is on a trucking companies web site to assist drivers who will be on the highways with trucks:

https://centurion.net.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Driver-Road-Safety-Tips-Card.pdf

Copy and past onto your browser.

 



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Gday...

A good and timely reminder - well presented and such basic info.

I hope forum members click on and read the link ... then save it or share it with others who are not on the forum.

It is all such common sense one would think that it was common knowledge. However, so often we see caravanners who don't know this basic information.

I will ask Cindy if she will make this post a Stickie.

Cheers - John



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the more information like this the safer our roads will be. now to inform the masses a stickie sounds like a good idea

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Hi,

The other safety tip is that when you see an oncoming road train on a narrow road and if it is safe to pull off the road, do so! They are much bigger and heavier than we are and can be quite unstable when dropping nearside wheels off. the second dog (Third trailer) can very easily flick across anything up to 2 - 3 metres and can take the side of your tow unit or van out without the road train driver even being aware.

Remember they are in charge of up to 150 tonnes plus, so a sideswipe of your van would easily go unnoticed by the driver in dusty conditions.
Having worked in construction in remote areas where this was a site rule, I have gained a great deal more respect for the ability of these blokes to manage their rigs, but there are still places where courtesy doesn't hurt and believe me, it doesn't go unnoticed. Just as we talk and communicate, so do road train drivers!

Regards

Dave

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Dave (Nutgrass)

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Absolutely and totally agree with the comments above....

A sticky would be great.

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Very well presented and useful reminder, thanks for the link, Gus1949.  I won't pass a road train with van if I can avoid it - I think you are in the danger zone for too long and it's just not worth it. Most roadtrains seem to get along at 100 or close to it, so I just settle down a couple of hundred yards behind and enjoy the scenery! When being overtaken, I always give a flash of headlights once the last dog is clear of me and from flashing indicators on the train, the drivers seem to appreciate it.  They have a tough job to do and it's good to be able to make their lives that little bit easier.



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Dave1952 wrote:

Hi,


The other safety tip is that when you see an oncoming road train on a narrow road and if it is safe to pull off the road, do so! They are much bigger and heavier than we are and can be quite unstable when dropping nearside wheels off. the second dog (Third trailer) can very easily flick across anything up to 2 - 3 metres and can take the side of your tow unit or van out without the road train driver even being aware.


Remember they are in charge of up to 150 tonnes plus, so a sideswipe of your van would easily go unnoticed by the driver in dusty conditions.

Having worked in construction in remote areas where this was a site rule, I have gained a great deal more respect for the ability of these blokes to manage their rigs, but there are still places where courtesy doesn't hurt and believe me, it doesn't go unnoticed. Just as we talk and communicate, so do road train drivers!


Regards


Dave





if the road train moves over to the side of the road there is a possibility of gravel to be thrown up resulting in damage to your vehicle especially on some of the development roads that are narrow

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rockylizard wrote:

Gday...

A good and timely reminder - well presented and such basic info.

I hope forum members click on and read the link ... then save it or share it with others who are not on the forum.

It is all such common sense one would think that it was common knowledge. However, so often we see caravanners who don't know this basic information.

I will ask Cindy if she will make this post a Stickie.

Cheers - John


 Perhaps the below pictures, (or a better one made by someone else) could be the sticky, John

OVERTAKING ROADTRAIN.png

OVERTAKING BY ROADTRAIN.png

 



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Tony

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Just added it to my 4X4 club page.

A great piece of advice.



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Couple of questions maybe someone familiar with trucks can advise me on:

1. When travelling along at, say, 90 - 95 and you see a large truck filling your rear camera, what is the best way to indicate to him that you are aware of him and are ready for him to pass (apart from using C40 of course). Ive heard it said that flicking the indicator to the right for a couple of flashes is the go, but it seems to me this might confuse the truck that you intend to turn right! I have found that once the road is clear, flicking left indicator for two flashes, then the right indicator for one flash seems to get the message across but would like to hear from the professionals.

2. The information provided says when a road train is overtaking you,  maintain your speed - I absolutely agree that speeding up would be very foolish, but what about watching for when the truck and his dogs have completely pulled out to the opposite lane, then backing off, say 10 to 15 kph, to let him get clear of you more quickly?

Thanks, Bula



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Bulariver wrote:

Couple of questions maybe someone familiar with trucks can advise me on:

1. When travelling along at, say, 90 - 95 and you see a large truck filling your rear camera, what is the best way to indicate to him that you are aware of him and are ready for him to pass (apart from using C40 of course). Ive heard it said that flicking the indicator to the right for a couple of flashes is the go, but it seems to me this might confuse the truck that you intend to turn right! I have found that once the road is clear, flicking left indicator for two flashes, then the right indicator for one flash seems to get the message across but would like to hear from the professionals.

2. The information provided says when a road train is overtaking you,  maintain your speed - I absolutely agree that speeding up would be very foolish, but what about watching for when the truck and his dogs have completely pulled out to the opposite lane, then backing off, say 10 to 15 kph, to let him get clear of you more quickly?

Thanks, Bula


 Hello, Bula

Number 2 is what I use to do, before I got my el cheapo hand held UHF

If/when the truckie does not answer me, and before I had the UHF, I would look for a road or parking to the left, put my left indicator on in plenty of time, and pull in to let them pass me



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It's also helpful to let a truckie know if you're planning to make a turn within the next few kilometres. I was approaching the turn-off to Karijini NP last week when a road train loomed up behind me. Called him up on ch40 to let him know I was ready for him to come past but added I was going to turn left soon towards the NP. He said thanks, that the turn-off was just a few bends ahead and he'd wait until I'd made the turn. He dropped back about 100m, and was already closing the gap as I turned off the highway, hardly losing any momentum so he was obviously familiar with the road. I think having a chat about your intentions gives them confidence that you know what you're doing.

One thing I've sometimes wondered is, at what point is a road train or B-double committed to continuing an overtake - where is the point of no return? I assume it would depend on the road and other conditions. Guess I'll have to ask a truckie whenever an opportunity arises.

Cheers,
Joe


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Joe50 wrote:

It's also helpful to let a truckie know if you're planning to make a turn within the next few kilometres. I was approaching the turn-off to Karijini NP last week when a road train loomed up behind me. Called him up on ch40 to let him know I was ready for him to come past but added I was going to turn left soon towards the NP. He said thanks, that the turn-off was just a few bends ahead and he'd wait until I'd made the turn. He dropped back about 100m, and was already closing the gap as I turned off the highway, hardly losing any momentum so he was obviously familiar with the road. I think having a chat about your intentions gives them confidence that you know what you're doing.

One thing I've sometimes wondered is, at what point is a road train or B-double committed to continuing an overtake - where is the point of no return? I assume it would depend on the road and other conditions. Guess I'll have to ask a truckie whenever an opportunity arises.

Cheers,
Joe


 Having done my share of truck driving although always rigid, my opinion is that the "point of no return" is solely the overtakers decision.

Whatever you do if being overtaken by a truck of any sort, do NOT brake or slow if you suddenly see (for instance) a vehicle coming toward you!

The decision of if there is time to complete the manoeuvre must be the overtaker's.

If you suddenly brake and at the same time the truck driver decides to brake as well, you will drop 50kmh but the truck will still be on the wrong side of the road.



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Thanks Delta 18, that makes sense - when being overtaken, maintain course and speed!
Bula

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When the truck,semi or road train (that includes B doubles and AB triples) begins to overtake, it is the drivers decision that it is safe for them to do so unless they are full of yippee beans, in which case, their judgement is flawed. That is much less the case these days, though, and we caravanners should simply maintain course and speed.

In my 20 plus years of caravanning, there have only been two occasions I can recall where I had to brake (quite heavily, as I recall) to allow a semi to overtake and get in. Both of those occasions were something over 15 years ago and Police and transport authorities are now much more stringent about driving safety.

As a former safety professional and former road safety coordinator, I can say with some degree of accuracy, that there will always be that one exception to the rule. When I am towing my van, I am aware of what is happening all around me, and if a semi comes up behind me, I know they are there. As soon as I have an opportunity, Ill use my indicators to signal them around, even if they have commenced the manoeuvre. This is standard trucking procedure, and that way, they know that I am aware of their presence.

Nine times out of ten, I dont have time, or am too busy concentrating on driving to use the UHF, especially if its a busy road coming from a major centre or is a major interstate route. The UHF is useful only if you have the time and are not distracted by using it.

One final thing to keep in mind is that if you are involved in a traffic incident and it can be proven that you were using the UHF immediately before the collision or rollover, you may find yourself on the receiving end of charges of driving without due care and attention, or at worst, dangerous driving. Something to be aware of when driving, isnt it?



-- Edited by Dave1952 on Monday 11th of June 2018 09:40:05 AM



-- Edited by Dave1952 on Monday 11th of June 2018 09:40:23 AM



-- Edited by Dave1952 on Monday 11th of June 2018 09:42:03 AM

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Dave (Nutgrass)

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Gday...

I offer the following regarding Dave's comment about using a CB radio while driving -

https://www.acrem.org.au/cb-info/using-cb-while-driving/

Please read the complete site - however, in short ...

ACT: mobile phone includes any other wire less hand-held device designed or capable of being used for telecommunication other than a CB radio or any other 2-way radio. [Road Transport (Safety and Traffic Management) Regulation 2000, section 30B, subsection 3].

NSW: mobile phone does not include a CB radio or any other two-way radio. [Road Rules 2014, Rule 300, paragraph 4].

VIC: mobile phone does not include a CB radio or any other two way radio [Road Safety Road Rules 2009, Rule 300, paragraph 4].

QLD: mobile phone does not include a CB radio or any other two-way radio. [Transport Operations (Road Use Management-Road Rules) Regulation 2009, section 300, subsection 2].

SA: mobile phone does not include a CB radio or any other two way radio [Australian Road Rules 2014, Rule 300, paragraph 4].

WA: mobile phone does not include a CB radio or any other two way radio [Road Traffic Code 2000, Regulation 265, paragraph 1].

TAS: mobile phone does not include a CB radio or any other two way radio [Road Rules 2009, Rule 300, paragraph 4].

NT: mobile phone does not include a CB radio or any other two way radio [Australian Road Rules 2014, Rule 300, paragraph 4].

Also note this -

This, very simply, means that using a hand held CB microphone is NOT illegal under the legislation that bans the use of mobile phones, and in fact there is no road rule than specifically bans the use of a CB or two-way radio microphone while driving. HOWEVER, there is legislation concerning the proper control of a motor vehicle (ARR 297), which means that while you could not be fined for holding and using a CB microphone, if you are not in full control of the vehicle because you are using the microphone you could be fined under that road rule.

and - 

Be aware that not every Police officer has knowledge of every single road rule; if they see you with a microphone in your hand be prepared to defend your actions! Be polite, point out it is a CB microphone and that under the Australian Road Rules it is exempted from the mobile phone rule, but in the end if the officer wishes to issue a fine you may need to defend your action in court.

 



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Thanks John for that additional clarification. You have done a great job of showing the legislative requirements. My point in my earlier post was regarding distraction caused by using such a device, but it is great to show the legal aspect. Much appreciated.

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Dave (Nutgrass)

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Dave 1952, Thanks for your input. When you say 'use my indicators to signal them around' how exactly do you do this - First Left then right or what? Is there a convention on this? I agree that using CB can be distracting, especially when you are trying to tuck the van to the edge of the bitumen on the left hand side and maintain a steady course. (My Navy past showing there!) Cheers, Bula

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Hi Bula,

When I signal them around, I use the right indicator to let them know that I'm aware that they are ready to come around. When the back of the last trailer is past the front end of my vehicle, I give them a flash on my headlights to let them know that it's safe for them to come back in.

Cheers

Dave

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Dave (Nutgrass)

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Left Brisbane a week ago, now traveled 1500ks to Muttaburra into the middle of Queensland travelling around the 90 kph mark towing our caravan, have not overtaken a road train or had one come up behind me. Seen a lots going the opposite direction Whats the who ar ?



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Maybe they are passing in your direction of travel when you are camped up at night, Radar. What route did you take to get there? Im guessing you travelled up to Muttaburra through Barcaldine and Aramac too? Im planning to get away for the Gemfields in the third week of July, so would be interested to find out which route you took and what road conditions are like?

Cheers
Dave

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Dave (Nutgrass)

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Dave1952 wrote:

Maybe they are passing in your direction of travel when you are camped up at night, Radar. What route did you take to get there? Im guessing you travelled up to Muttaburra through Barcaldine and Aramac too? Im planning to get away for the Gemfields in the third week of July, so would be interested to find out which route you took and what road conditions are like?

Cheers
Dave


 Brisbane, Nanago, Gayndah, Biloela, Moura, Emerald, Barcaldine, Aramac to Muttaburra.

All sealed roads, some road works but nothing serious. This way is fairly quite, Gomerri to Biloela some ups and downs.

Good rest areas along the way.



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Thanks Radar,
I know that route pretty well. I wondered if you had perhaps gone via the Warrego Highway to Morven then north, or via the Carnarvon or Leichhardt Highways. I guess the Dawson Highway between Moura and Rolleston is still a bit up and down? I havent travelled that road since 2015 when I worked in Moura.
Cheers
Dave

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Dave (Nutgrass)

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Carpe Diem - Seize the day!

You never get a second chance at a first impression, so make the first a good one.



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Re : Isuzu mux


I was thinking of purchasing a mux for towing a caravan are these vehicles adequate for this purpose.would like some feedback.tom.

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RE: Road Train Etiquette


This program may also be of interest. It is designed to help caravanners and trucks interact better on the highways.

http://truckfriendly.com.au/

Let me know your thoughts.

Cheers

Ken

 



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Check out this site.

http://truckfriendly.com.au/

 



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Hey Rain Maker, that is a great site. Thanks for the info, even though, as someone having plenty of long distance heavy driving experience, I do not need the info, but I can refer plenty of nomads and would be nomads. Thanks again.

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Dave (Nutgrass)

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Carpe Diem - Seize the day!

You never get a second chance at a first impression, so make the first a good one.



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ive been told to get a cb radio so trucks can contact you if theyre coming from behind 

my question is :- are hand held radios legal in a vehicle? (Because holding a mobile phone is not legal)



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They are not a mobile phone. Mobile phones are the only device specified in that legislation. Feel free to use a handheld CB.

"ive been told to get a cb radio so trucks can contact you." The truckies do not contact you. Despite the number of vans with a CB channel number on them the occupants mostly do not reply. The truckies have simply given up trying to make contact. You will have to initiate any contact made to others.



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Retired radio and electronics technician.
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Rain Maker wrote:

This program may also be of interest. It is designed to help caravanners and trucks interact better on the highways.

http://truckfriendly.com.au/

Let me know your thoughts.


 It's just a duplicate effort of this one - TRUCKRIGHT Road Safety by Rod Hannifey People seem to have forgotten Rod. 



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Retired radio and electronics technician.
NSW Central Coast.

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